Seleziona una pagina

Consorzio Promovetro is always close to the City of Venice and its traditions, even when glass is not directly involved in them, just as it happens in this case.

Towards the end of 17th century the venetian merchant Davide Zappio bought a palace in Rynek square, the main square of Warsaw.

The merchant decided to decorate his palace’s façade with a marble bas relief representing St. Mark’s lion.

During the 20th century, especially during the second world war Nazi bombing, this beautiful work was completely lost, without any surviving trace of it.

 

The Italian journalist Sebastiano Giorgi, who shared his project with Consorzio Promovetro, came to know the story of the venetian lion during an interview with Robert Kunkel, professor of history of architecture at the polytechnic university of Warsaw.

 

Now this lion in coming back to life!

 

The new sculpture, realised by Giovanni Giusto, venetian sculptor specialized in marble working, will take its place in the very same palace, during a special event with the Mayor of Warsaw, Hanna Gronkiewicz-Waltz, who has received a special gift from Consorzio Promovetro: a Vetro Artistico® Murano “osella”, representing St. Mark’s Lion.

 

The connection between Murano and the capital of Poland goes back in the history. In the 18th century the name “Murano” entered Polish toponimy when a Italian architect called his villa “Murano”, to remind the people of the splendour and elegance of Venetian productions.

Nowadays the area called “Muranow”, right in the centre of Warsaw, is named after this territory.

 

This event represents an occasion to reinforce the relationship between the two cities, which have been connected for centuries thanks to the venetians merchant activities and, why not, to Murano Glass.

Consorzio Promovetro is always close to the City of Venice and its traditions, even when glass is not directly involved in them, just as it happens in this case.

Towards the end of 17th century the venetian merchant Davide Zappio bought a palace in Rynek square, the main square of Warsaw.

The merchant decided to decorate his palace’s façade with a marble bas relief representing St. Mark’s lion.

During the 20th century, especially during the second world war Nazi bombing, this beautiful work was completely lost, without any surviving trace of it.

 

The Italian journalist Sebastiano Giorgi, who shared his project with Consorzio Promovetro, came to know the story of the venetian lion during an interview with Robert Kunkel, professor of history of architecture at the polytechnic university of Warsaw.

 

Now this lion in coming back to life!

 

The new sculpture, realised by Giovanni Giusto, venetian sculptor specialized in marble working, will take its place in the very same palace, during a special event with the Mayor of Warsaw, Hanna Gronkiewicz-Waltz, who has received a special gift from Consorzio Promovetro: a Vetro Artistico® Murano “osella”, representing St. Mark’s Lion.

 

The connection between Murano and the capital of Poland goes back in the history. In the 18th century the name “Murano” entered Polish toponimy when a Italian architect called his villa “Murano”, to remind the people of the splendour and elegance of Venetian productions.

Nowadays the area called “Muranow”, right in the centre of Warsaw, is named after this territory.

 

This event represents an occasion to reinforce the relationship between the two cities, which have been connected for centuries thanks to the venetians merchant activities and, why not, to Murano Glass.

Consorzio Promovetro is always close to the City of Venice and its traditions, even when glass is not directly involved in them, just as it happens in this case.

Towards the end of 17th century the venetian merchant Davide Zappio bought a palace in Rynek square, the main square of Warsaw.

The merchant decided to decorate his palace’s façade with a marble bas relief representing St. Mark’s lion.

During the 20th century, especially during the second world war Nazi bombing, this beautiful work was completely lost, without any surviving trace of it.

 

The Italian journalist Sebastiano Giorgi, who shared his project with Consorzio Promovetro, came to know the story of the venetian lion during an interview with Robert Kunkel, professor of history of architecture at the polytechnic university of Warsaw.

 

Now this lion in coming back to life!

 

The new sculpture, realised by Giovanni Giusto, venetian sculptor specialized in marble working, will take its place in the very same palace, during a special event with the Mayor of Warsaw, Hanna Gronkiewicz-Waltz, who has received a special gift from Consorzio Promovetro: a Vetro Artistico® Murano “osella”, representing St. Mark’s Lion.

 

The connection between Murano and the capital of Poland goes back in the history. In the 18th century the name “Murano” entered Polish toponimy when a Italian architect called his villa “Murano”, to remind the people of the splendour and elegance of Venetian productions.

Nowadays the area called “Muranow”, right in the centre of Warsaw, is named after this territory.

 

This event represents an occasion to reinforce the relationship between the two cities, which have been connected for centuries thanks to the venetians merchant activities and, why not, to Murano Glass.

Consorzio Promovetro is always close to the City of Venice and its traditions, even when glass is not directly involved in them, just as it happens in this case.

Towards the end of 17th century the venetian merchant Davide Zappio bought a palace in Rynek square, the main square of Warsaw.

The merchant decided to decorate his palace’s façade with a marble bas relief representing St. Mark’s lion.

During the 20th century, especially during the second world war Nazi bombing, this beautiful work was completely lost, without any surviving trace of it.

 

The Italian journalist Sebastiano Giorgi, who shared his project with Consorzio Promovetro, came to know the story of the venetian lion during an interview with Robert Kunkel, professor of history of architecture at the polytechnic university of Warsaw.

 

Now this lion in coming back to life!

 

The new sculpture, realised by Giovanni Giusto, venetian sculptor specialized in marble working, will take its place in the very same palace, during a special event with the Mayor of Warsaw, Hanna Gronkiewicz-Waltz, who has received a special gift from Consorzio Promovetro: a Vetro Artistico® Murano “osella”, representing St. Mark’s Lion.

 

The connection between Murano and the capital of Poland goes back in the history. In the 18th century the name “Murano” entered Polish toponimy when a Italian architect called his villa “Murano”, to remind the people of the splendour and elegance of Venetian productions.

Nowadays the area called “Muranow”, right in the centre of Warsaw, is named after this territory.

 

This event represents an occasion to reinforce the relationship between the two cities, which have been connected for centuries thanks to the venetians merchant activities and, why not, to Murano Glass.

Consorzio Promovetro is always close to the City of Venice and its traditions, even when glass is not directly involved in them, just as it happens in this case.

Towards the end of 17th century the venetian merchant Davide Zappio bought a palace in Rynek square, the main square of Warsaw.

The merchant decided to decorate his palace’s façade with a marble bas relief representing St. Mark’s lion.

During the 20th century, especially during the second world war Nazi bombing, this beautiful work was completely lost, without any surviving trace of it.

 

The Italian journalist Sebastiano Giorgi, who shared his project with Consorzio Promovetro, came to know the story of the venetian lion during an interview with Robert Kunkel, professor of history of architecture at the polytechnic university of Warsaw.

 

Now this lion in coming back to life!

 

The new sculpture, realised by Giovanni Giusto, venetian sculptor specialized in marble working, will take its place in the very same palace, during a special event with the Mayor of Warsaw, Hanna Gronkiewicz-Waltz, who has received a special gift from Consorzio Promovetro: a Vetro Artistico® Murano “osella”, representing St. Mark’s Lion.

 

The connection between Murano and the capital of Poland goes back in the history. In the 18th century the name “Murano” entered Polish toponimy when a Italian architect called his villa “Murano”, to remind the people of the splendour and elegance of Venetian productions.

Nowadays the area called “Muranow”, right in the centre of Warsaw, is named after this territory.

 

This event represents an occasion to reinforce the relationship between the two cities, which have been connected for centuries thanks to the venetians merchant activities and, why not, to Murano Glass.

Consorzio Promovetro is always close to the City of Venice and its traditions, even when glass is not directly involved in them, just as it happens in this case.

Towards the end of 17th century the venetian merchant Davide Zappio bought a palace in Rynek square, the main square of Warsaw.

The merchant decided to decorate his palace’s façade with a marble bas relief representing St. Mark’s lion.

During the 20th century, especially during the second world war Nazi bombing, this beautiful work was completely lost, without any surviving trace of it.

 

The Italian journalist Sebastiano Giorgi, who shared his project with Consorzio Promovetro, came to know the story of the venetian lion during an interview with Robert Kunkel, professor of history of architecture at the polytechnic university of Warsaw.

 

Now this lion in coming back to life!

 

The new sculpture, realised by Giovanni Giusto, venetian sculptor specialized in marble working, will take its place in the very same palace, during a special event with the Mayor of Warsaw, Hanna Gronkiewicz-Waltz, who has received a special gift from Consorzio Promovetro: a Vetro Artistico® Murano “osella”, representing St. Mark’s Lion.

 

The connection between Murano and the capital of Poland goes back in the history. In the 18th century the name “Murano” entered Polish toponimy when a Italian architect called his villa “Murano”, to remind the people of the splendour and elegance of Venetian productions.

Nowadays the area called “Muranow”, right in the centre of Warsaw, is named after this territory.

 

This event represents an occasion to reinforce the relationship between the two cities, which have been connected for centuries thanks to the venetians merchant activities and, why not, to Murano Glass.

Il Consorzio Promovetro è vicino alla sua città e alle sue tradizioni, anche quando il vetro di Murano non è il principale protagonista. Come in questa bella storia, che ha origini lontane .


Tutto iniziò alla fine del ‘600 quando il mercante veneziano Davide Zappio, acquistò un palazzetto che si affacciava sulla piazza principale di Varsavia, Piazza Rynek.
Immediatamente, il mercante abbellì la facciata del suo palazzetto con un bassorilievo in marmo raffigurante il Leone di San Marco. Purtroppo, della bella effigie si sono perse le sue tracce già agli inizi del 1900, e successivamente andata definitivamente perduta con i bombardamenti della seconda guerra mondiale, quando la città, venne quasi integralmente distrutta dai nazisti.

 

Il promotore della rinascita del leone di San Marco nella città polacca, che ha voluto condividere il progetto con il Consorzio Promovetro, è il giornalista Sebastiano Giorgi che è venuto a conoscenza di questo particolare aneddoto durante un’intervista con il professore di Storia dell’Architettura al Politecnico di Varsavia Robert Kunkel.

 

La nuova opera, che sarà realizzata dallo scultore e marmista Giovanni Giusto, verrà riposizionata in tutta la sua bellezza sulla facciata del palazzo che dal lontano ‘600 la ospitava in occasione di una rievocazione storica al cospetto del Sindaco di Varsavia, Hanna Gronkiewicz-Waltz al quale il Consorzio ha omaggiato un’osella in vetro di Murano contrassegnata dal marchio Vetro Artistico® Murano con l’effige del leone marciano.

 

Un legame secolare quello tra il vetro di Murano e la capitale polacca basti ricordare che già nel settecento il nome “Murano” era già noto tra i nobili polacchi e curiosamente è entrato nella toponomastica di Varsavia allorquando un architetto lombardo, che aveva firmato molte opere e progetti nella città, decise di chiamare la sua villa Murano per evocare i fasti e l’eleganza della produzione veneziana. La villa fu costruita su un terreno donato dal re, allora considerato fuori Varsavia e oggi corrispondente al centralissimo quartiere Muranów che ne prese il nome.

 

Un’occasione per rafforzare e impreziosire il rapporto tra due importanti città artistiche, legate commercialmente da secoli grazie all’attività dei mercanti veneziani e perché no dalla presenza del vetro di Murano. 

Consorzio Promovetro is always close to the City of Venice and its traditions, even when glass is not directly involved in them, just as it happens in this case.

Towards the end of 17th century the venetian merchant Davide Zappio bought a palace in Rynek square, the main square of Warsaw.

The merchant decided to decorate his palace’s façade with a marble bas relief representing St. Mark’s lion.

During the 20th century, especially during the second world war Nazi bombing, this beautiful work was completely lost, without any surviving trace of it.

 

The Italian journalist Sebastiano Giorgi, who shared his project with Consorzio Promovetro, came to know the story of the venetian lion during an interview with Robert Kunkel, professor of history of architecture at the polytechnic university of Warsaw.

 

Now this lion in coming back to life!

 

The new sculpture, realised by Giovanni Giusto, venetian sculptor specialized in marble working, will take its place in the very same palace, during a special event with the Mayor of Warsaw, Hanna Gronkiewicz-Waltz, who has received a special gift from Consorzio Promovetro: a Vetro Artistico® Murano “osella”, representing St. Mark’s Lion.

 

The connection between Murano and the capital of Poland goes back in the history. In the 18th century the name “Murano” entered Polish toponimy when a Italian architect called his villa “Murano”, to remind the people of the splendour and elegance of Venetian productions.

Nowadays the area called “Muranow”, right in the centre of Warsaw, is named after this territory.

 

This event represents an occasion to reinforce the relationship between the two cities, which have been connected for centuries thanks to the venetians merchant activities and, why not, to Murano Glass.

Konsorcjum Promovetro jest blisko swego miasta i tradycji, nawet gdy szkło z Murano nie gra pierwszych skrzypiec. Tak jak w przypadku tej pięknej historii, której początek sięga zamierzchłych czasów.


Wszystko zaczęło się pod koniec XVII wieku, kiedy to wenecki kupiec Davide Zappio nabył kamieniczkę znajdującą się na głównym placu w Warszawie, na Rynku Starego Miasta.
Kupiec od razu upiększył fasadę budynku marmurową płaskorzeźbą przedstawiającą Lwa św. Marka. Niestety, po pięknym wizerunku ślad zaginął już na początku XX wieku, a następnie został on ostatecznie utracony w wyniku bombardowań podczas Drugiej Wojny Światowej, kiedy miasto zostało niemal doszczętnie zniszczone przez nazistów.


Propagatorem przywrócenia Lwa św. Marka w polskim mieście, które chciało współdzielić ten projekt z Konsorcjum Promovetro, jest dziennikarz Sebastiano Giorgi, który dowiedział się o tej niezwykłej historii podczas wywiadu z profesorem Historii Architektury na Politechnice Warszawskiej Robertem Kunkelem.


Nowe dzieło, które zostanie wykonane przez rzeźbiarza i mistrza kamieniarstwa Giovanniego Giusto, zostanie umieszczone w całej swojej krasie na fasadzie kamienicy, w której się znajdowało aż od XVII wieku, w związku z historyczną uroczystością z udziałem Pani Prezydent Warszawy, Hanny Gronkiewicz-Waltz, której Konsorcjum podarowało przycisk do papieru ze szkła z Murano, sygnowany znakiem jakości Szkła Artystycznego® Murano, przedstawiający Lwa św. Marka.


Jeśli chodzi o kilkusetletnie powiązanie między szkłem z Murano a stolicą Polski, wystarczy przypomnieć, że już w XVIII wieku nazwa “Murano” była znana wśród szlachty polskiej i, co ciekawe, zaczęła występować w toponimii Warszawy odkąd lombardzki architekt, autor wielu dzieł oraz projektów w mieście, zdecydował nazwać swój pałacyk Murano, aby przywołać wspaniałość i elegancję produkcji weneckiej. Postawiono go na terenach przyznanych przez króla, wówczas będących poza Warszawą, dziś natomiast odpowiadają one znajdującej się w ścisłym centrum dzielnicy Muranów, której nazwa pochodzi właśnie od pałacyku.


To okazja służąca umocnieniu oraz upiększeniu relacji pomiędzy dwoma ważnymi miastami artystycznymi, od wieków związanymi handlowo dzięki działalności kupców weneckich oraz obecności szkła z Murano.